A TEXAN, A SAINT, AND A BRIGHT RED JAG

First of all, a message to my friend in Texas:

redskins

It’s a real pleasure to watch the Redskins this year, especially with our Kirk Cousins at QB.

krik

I know he’s young but he did all right for us! Hope you grow to like him, even after RGIII returns to the game.

MSU in action:

SAMSUNG

It’s that time of the year.    It’s that time of the year when the world’s temporary  pleasures call my attention down from  important and eternal things.

St. Francis de Borgia sits ever heavy on my shoulders, leading me to imbalance, teaching me that one cannot live with the world and heaven in equal proportions.  I know that.

St Francis Borgia and skull

He might seem like a very severe and stern saint to choose to listen to in this modern age of pleasure seeking, but, really,  he only wanted to always do what is exactly right and pleasing to his Lord Jesus.    Since I would like that too,  I listen to him, learning from his life and his example.  He was a good man and a good teacher.

And besides,  in his younger life,  he started out really liking ball games!  I shall deal with football in my life — as he did.

Which brings me to the bright red jaguar.

red jag

I had a really strange encounter on Sunday morning, with a man and his bright red jaguar.    Believe me, that photo does not do it justice.   Seen in person and close up,  that car is a work of art!

This car was parked right across the street from mine on Sunday, after “church,” and the man who owned that car and I arrived at our parked cars   right at the same time.   Since I could not drag my eyes away from his car, I gave him time to notice me staring at his car.   I said something, like, “That’s a real beauty.”    And I meant it.

But he has apparently dealt with his beautiful car before, and on another level.   He said thanks,  but he went on to explain that he knows how expensive it is, what a luxury, what an indulgence,  but he said, “I donate lots of money to places like Haiti. . . .”    putting his purchase, I suppose, in context.

I don’t mind at all that he has lots of money for big donations to poor people in Haiti and still have enough left over to buy a beautiful jag.   I didn’t doubt his generosity at all.    Then, since he had mentioned Haiti,  he opened his gray sports coat and pointed to his beautiful black sweater and said it  cost   $xxx   (but I don’t hardly believe a sweater could cost that much!)  and he said he knows that is more than most people in Haiti make in a year, but . . . .    I’m not sure what he said next, but since I didn’t find any fault with him at all,  I agreed that God had been very good to him in material things and although it’s a good thing to share with the Haitians,  I also assured him that God has given Americans a different set of challenges.    He seemed to understand what I meant.

Nah….  I didn’t sound all schoolmarmy  like that  —   it was a natural and very short conversation.   I thought about that conversation all the way home on Sunday – and beyond, apparently.

I’ve just begun to make big changes in the house I live in.    I didn’t realize how shabby it had become after 40 years of neglect.   Well, I knew it was old and shabby,  but I didn’t know how bad that was.  And now I have to put a lot of money into my house,  more money, of course, than a typical Haitian makes in a year.

I suspect, like many of you,  I don’t worry about staying warm this winter or where my clean water will come from.   I’m grateful for all of that,  for a safe house and for a reliable car, even though it cost one-fifth of that red jaguar!    I do have material riches, relatively speaking,  but there are other, very serious, challenges to sort out.

And that’s where St. Francis de Borgia returns.    Wealthy, handsome, noble son of Spain — he had everything this world could offer, and he knew that nothing this world could offer was of lasting value.

For a human being,  for a created creature, nothing is more important than the Two Great Commandments:   Love the Lord your God (your Creator) with all you heart and mind and strength;  and love your neighbor as yourself.

Material wealth is immaterial.   In a hundred years, we will all know what was important here on earth.

Advertisements
Explore posts in the same categories: Christendom, Christian Analysis, Culture, Current Events, Football, saint

Tags: , , , , ,

You can comment below, or link to this permanent URL from your own site.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: