WHAT’S IT? — #20

My posts have been a bit “heavy” lately –  I’m ready for a little diversion.   So here is #20  in my series called “What’s It.”   (See “Rule…”  below.)     I promise to learn some day how to make a Page Tab at the top and put all the What’s Its on one Page.

So here is a science What’s It:

What's It  #18

This object was photographed above our earth by a satellite camera that was taking photos of things floating around high in the . . .   ionosphere, I think.      The folded surface with a round hole blasted into it is an extremely thin membrane around a balloon-type piece of equipment close to the satellite near the highly sensitive photomicroscopic camera which took this picture.

In other words,  that strange white globe is microscopic in size.  About 10 microns.  About the width of a human hair.      The camera seems to have inadvertently caught one of these globes in the act of spitting a stream of substances with enough force to tear a hole in the membrane.   Spectrographic analysis indicates a biological substance of unknown origin.

The shiny tiny globe is composed of titanium and a little vanadium and some other things unknown to us.

Scientist Wainwright from the United  Kingdom calls the substance spewing out from the globe “a gooey biological liquid.”     (Yick.)

I need to make that Page Tab soon.  When I want to look at previous What’s Its now, I have to use the Search function at the bottom of the right-hand column and type in What’s It  # (whatever).   

And just to remind us: 

 Here’s the Rule for my What’s It series:   it will be a photo of something that no one knows what it is;  not even me.  I won’t trick you.   No one knows what these What’s Its are.    They will be a real photo of an unknown something.

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