WHAT THEY DON’T GET

(updated, to tamp down the enthusiasm and perhaps make more sense):

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Sunday!

Strengthened,  happy,  and all-pumped up —  and ready for this:

nascar-blur

Daytona Day!!!    I’m happy to have this one day out of the week when we’re commanded to stop, pause,  refresh,  recreate,   change your pace,  change mental gears so we can look upwards,  make this day set apart  (made  holy)  — to remember God.     His idea:  one day out of seven, right?

The age-old Reading given to us  to ponder on this particular Sunday concerns  a man who sat in a dusty (probably smelly) heap on the side of a well-traveled dirt road holding out his hand,  begging.

blind-eyes

No one cared.  No one glanced his way,  because he was annoying.   We have bums like that today,  but for this man,  his situation wasn’t entirely his fault.    He was unseen and  unseeing.  He was blind from birth.  Really,  of no use to the society of his day.

This is one of my favorite stories from the Gospels, because it isn’t really about this man’s   blindness.

Jesus walks by with a great noisy crowd around Him,  but then he comes to a sudden halt – causing the crowd around him to stop too.   What for?   Jesus has heard the call of the blind man,  and He has heard the man dare to call him “Thou Son of David!”    There is only one Son of David,   but the crowd missed it.

bartemaus

Jesus rewarded  Bartimaeus’s  faith with a physical miracle.

I like the story, sure.  I’ve written about it before, like here.    But after the sermon,  the Mass went on . . .

As I was driving home,  I was musing on why I often feel so strong and happy after the Mass.  (   I’m referring to the actual,  original real  Mass which was entrusted to the Church and cannot be lessened and diminished.)

The (real) Mass is  a spiritual miracle,  but, like Bartimaeus,  it seemed like I often experience a physical miracle too.   I can’t explain it all,  but I thought of all the people who “don’t get it”  and what it is they don’t seem to “get.”

They don’t get:

Why we go to Mass every week – or more – and willingly.

Why we’ll bother with ashes this week.

Why we don’t eat meat of Friday.

Why we keep the marital act within a marriage.

Why  our commitment to stay in a marriage is a strong one.

Why we give our hard-earned money away to people in need.

Why we hold back when there is reason to be really angry.

Why we refrain from cussing and swearing and talking trash about other people.

Why we look uncomfortable as we’re hearing dirty jokes.

Why we dress modestly.

Why we read the Bible,  on our own, because we want to.

Why fun feels so . .  .  fun!

Lots of other things too –  but I was writing this list as I was driving home and thought it best to keep the list short.

There are many things to be blind to.    And I know there are many reasons for a man to be blind,  willingly blind.

bland-hands-sjpg

Jesus reached out to Blind  Bartimaeus  with  concern,  pity,  love,  kindness,  and with power.   Suddenly Bartimaeus  sees  Jesus standing before him.

As we all will some day.   When we leave this world,  we will see Him with perfect clarity.   No explanations from us are needed.

No explanations  from us are possible.

No excuses.

“We will know as we are known.”   We will no longer “see through a glass, darkly,  but clearly,  face to face.”  Some day not one of us will be blind to what we should have known.

Seems safer to call out now to the Son of David   (as Bartimaeus did);  today,  rather than after this life.   Jesus reaches out today with the same ” concern,  pity,  love,  kindness,  and  power..”      When we look up,  respond, call out His name,   we begin to “see” so much.   “I have come to give you Life, and that, much more abundantly.”

Strong,  happy,  whole, and mysteriously  pumped up after each encounter!

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