TWO PERSPECTIVES

I’m into my third week of having no TV.   The system components are broken.  Or else all the HDMI ports are fried again.    Someone is going to come to fix the ports next week, and then I’ll be able to tell what else went wrong.

One gets a different perspective on the world without TV.

Here’s something I saw on my way in to class this evening:

Ducklings cr

Right downtown, in our little city which is the capital city of our state,  in busy traffic,  6:10 p.m.,   someone had gotten out of his car and stopped all traffic to allow this mother and her little ducklings to cross the street.   The streets were full, cars coming from all directions,  and yet no one even beeped their horns.   Lots of smiles and thumbs up to the man who was out there guiding those ducklings across the street.

It reminded me of how many “nice” people I see every time I drive in this area.   There are groups of people on the street,  men and women talking together,  men of different races carrying briefcases and walking together or discussing something on the street corner.   Race, age or sex,  it doesn’t seem to matter.    Rich people poor people;  people are just . . .  working together,  living next to each other.

It’s not like you see on the television entertainment-news.   Not like the Soros-funded staged “protest”  riots, protesting everyday American things.

I think there was an attempt at that this week, though.  On Monday,  our local news announced over and over again that there would be protest meetings and demonstrations on the capital lawn for – I forget what all, but one of them was the legalization of marijuana.

cap

Here’s our capital building,  just one block west of where those ducklings were.   When I heard about the scheduled “protests,”  I thought,  oh, oh,  I have to drive that way right in the middle of all that.    May Day protests – all around the world, the news said!!

Well, as I drove by,  I saw some people.  Maybe about 18, maybe a little more,  standing near those steps.   Didn’t look like much.  Less than a busload of schoolchildren gathering for a tour of the capitol building.

I’ve seen bigger crowds there, of course.  I was part of really big rally once.    That crowd was concerned and alert, but friendly and peaceful.  When one young man waved a poster and shouted out some bad language in imitation of what he’d seen on television,  people around him formed a circle and one man said, “We don’t do things like that here.”   The circle kind of edged toward the side of the capitol lawn and the young man “dispersed” himself and walked away.

Without television programming and “news,”  I forget we’re supposed to be a “divided” nation on the brink of civil war.     That’s not what I see when I look around me, at my neighborhood,  my town,  our little capital city.    It’s not what I see when I drive cross-country through many other little towns and cities.

We have problems, of course, and sometimes local politics get “hot,”  but you win some, you lose some,  and you come back to fight another day.    We don’t destroy our political opponents.

So what’s real life?   Raging cities,  burning, rioting cities?   Or everyday life,  like I see most commonly,  wherever I go?    I wonder about that.

As long as it lasts,   these days are okay.   We can work to solve our problems.

I hope the hyped-up drama we see on television doesn’t produce a new reality.

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