Archive for October 7, 2017

II. FLAG AT LEPANTO

October 7, 2017

 

It’s October 7th.     

Lepanto

One of the “Top Ten Dates”  to know and to remember,  because on this day in 1571 Europe was saved.

Without this victory we would not have known:

 
Freedom  (of religion, of speech, of thought, of action)

The predominance of the English language

The idea of Human Rights

Equal protection under the law for men and women

Universities

The concept of fair justice

Advanced science

Holy Matrimony

Justice and Morality given to us by our Creator

And more . . .

L battle

It was a hard-fought and mostly naval battle.     Christian Europe against the Turkish Empire.    The ships of  “Suleiman the Magnificent”  vastly outnumbered the European fleet.  Everything was against the Christians.

Famous non-military people in European history fought at this battle.

LCervantes

The author Cervantes, for example,  who afterwards would write his  famous novel of  political commentary  called  Don Quixote.   Used to be valuable, required reading for citizens of the Western world.    He wrote it without the use of his left arm,  destroyed in the battle at Lepanto.

Everyone acknowledges that the victory was a supernatural one.

L and Mary

This onslaught of superior Moslem forces needed to be stopped in order to ensure the survival of Europe,  but the European kings weren’t exactly paying attention.   Most didn’t want to get involved.   It was Pope Pius V who rallied a few leaders to fight,  a little money to equip the tiny European navy,  and inspired the prayers of many.    The pope called for much prayer,  including an appeal to Heaven through the use of the rosary.

Heaven responded to the pope’s call and to the people’s prayers with a mighty (and unfortunately somewhat unrecorded)  vision of the battle at the moment of the unexpected victory of the European forces.  

As usual, in war and battles,  flags were an issue.   You followed your flag.  Your flag raised was your inspiration.  A flag captured was an acknowledgement of defeat.  The Europeans captured the Turkish actual banner  and presented it to the pope, amid celebrations,  for this victory promised the future existence of  Europe and of Christendom.

Until this century.

Another mighty enemy,  more powerful,  more subtle,  more persistent,  more well-financed,  and more pervasive  rose up in the past two or three centuries,  and by the 20th century there were few fighting this unacknowledged war.  Some popes sounded the alarm, of course,  some European leaders and scholars,   some laymen . . . .

By the mid 20th century it seems the tables had been turned on Christian Europe, which was not left with much Christianity.   No surprise.  This had been foretold in numerous prophecies throughout the ages,  but nevertheless,   here it was,  and here was Pope Paul VI  making his “magnanimous”  gesture of  “good will”  –  as he publicly returned the Turkish banner, captured at Lepanto,   back to the Turkish government!

Thereby voiding the meaning and importance of the victory at Lepanto.

________________________________________________________________

 

L ruins

According to those prophecies,  the Church has to go through its preordained time of  abandonment and apparent defeat, as it reprises the life of Christ her Lord,  who also had a time of abandonment and apparent defeat on Calvary.

But that wasn’t the End.

 

______________________________________________

 

(This is not an American thing.  New from Europe –

A million Catholics gather on the Polish border in a massive Rosary Crusade entitled “Rosary on the Borders”  to commemorate the Battle of Lepanto,  during which the outnumbered  Christian naval fleet dealt a massive blow to the Muslim Ottoman Empire, saving Christendom from Islamic domination.”

From:   https:/   /www.    thomasmore.   org/    million-catholics-pray-rosary-polands-border-commemorating-defeat-islam-battle-lepanto/

 

Why are the Polish people doing this?    Because Turkey  (and Islam)  is not done fighting.

l turkey today

 

 

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I. FLAG, FOOTBALL, AND DROUGHT

October 7, 2017

Looking out my kitchen window right now, a lively, noisy scene:

f Window

Sunshine.   Cool air.     Fall flowers.   The after-effects of a little rainstorm.   The leaves are changing,  and the wind is blowing.   If you stood outside under a tree,  you’d think it was still raining because the wind blows the raindrops off the leaves and creates a second rainstorm.   Acorns plunk down on the roof and roll all the way down to the ground.

I love Fall,  not the least because it m e a n s  used to mean football.    I always dreaded February because that was the beginning of  the “long drought”  of no football.

Droughts are no fun.  But I see now that they can end;  they can be ended.   Apparently some droughts are a matter of opinion:    Several weeks ago  I left this rather damp northern climate and traveled across the (dry) prairie and the (dry)  Great Plains and the  (dry) high desert, and then to the (very dry)  High Sierras.

f bottle grass

Family and friends who live there high in the mountains have learned to drink water – all the time.   The desert and altitude suck the moisture right out of a person’s body.    Everyone on a bicycle, skateboard, walking, boating was carrying a container of water with him.  Even the children, whether at parties or swimming or playing a game of soccer – when it was their turn to do something,  they would first set their water bottle down in the grass,  go do their thing, then come right back to the water.

“Drought normal.”   I didn’t mind it, but I did have difficulty returning home, where I kept remarking in astonishment – to everyone –  how humid it is!    I could  hardly breathe in the hot and  thick, sticky air!   Needless to say,  they were experiencing “normal”  air, and even corrected me by saying, “It’s been so dry for so long . . .  we need rain . . . our lawns are turning brown.”   (Not that I could see.)

f and ross
So I was able to become philosophical about this drought thing with  football,  the “long wait”  until the next game.    I had returned home right in  the middle of the “disrespect your flag” controversy that some of the football players were perpetrating by making their knees a sign of resistance –  although resistance to what was a movable target.

Betsy Ross and the ladies who sewed our first flags together did so not only believing in the United States of America and all the things the new nation stands for,  but also knowing full well that their men, their loved ones,  might very well be dying for it.

f scott flag“The bombs bursting in air”   gave Francis Scott Key reassurance that the flag was still flying,  but you can see that flag now, in our nation’s capital,  and it’s in tatters.

The price of America is American lives.   It cost us something.   And it still will cost us something in the dread near future.

My Friday morning class was discussing “things in general” for a while,  and although they really aren’t political and they really aren’t too aware of current issues,  they do watch the entertainment-news media — and they all expressed a vague sort of fear for the near future.    That surprised me.   One lady patted her stomach and said, “It’s not very strong, but I feel in here a small sense of  doom.”

Doom?     We don’t have “doomy” discussions, usually,  but I could see it struck a chord in the others.    And, unfortunately,  now that she mentioned it,  in me.

So that’s what I meant:    “America”  cost us something.   And it still will cost us something in the dread near future.   

I used to count up the hours per week that I watched football, (yikes!)  and told myself,  oh, well, it’s such a short season . . . .       But  here’s my new equation:

NFL Players Union  +  the Global Socialist Soros-funded activism =   Not me

 

f blimp

“Not me.”       I’m out of this picture for a while.

This kind of “drought”  is all in one’s personal perception.

There is  the big annual intrastate university football game today.   Big rivalry!    I’ll watch that.  But as for the NFL games –  I’ve think I’ve gained a lot of free hours.     I love football,   but when I want to watch a game,  I don’t want to watch the Opposing Team’s politics.

Not me.

 

f off

 

I love football.  And my country.  And my flag.