“DO YOU BELIEVE IN MAGIC?”

Nah, I just wrote the title that way because it’s the name of a song . . .   Really:  Do you believe in the supernatural?    That would be the name of this little story,  for you.

a rose

Is there really a supernatural, a God, a Heaven,  saints, a spiritual dimension alongside ours?

Think  about a “painting”  of a beautiful young pregnant Lady which was so well done and detailed that scientists who use a microscope can see the reflection of three or four men in the room looking at her — in the pupils of her eyes!!!

pupils

 

How about the beautiful blue robe that Lady is wearing had been “painted” with stars on it, showing the accurate position of stars and constellations right above the location of that painting — almost five hundred years ago.

stars

 

How about that “painting”  showing up in a place in Central America that just happened to contain all the icons and symbols and colors and elements of the pagan religion of the area – being trodden under foot by that Lady.

How about that “painting”  was done on some cactus plant fibers that crumble and disintegrate after ten or so years, at the most,  but somehow still fresh and new-looking after almost five centuries.

How about a bomb that  detonated in the building where this “painting”  is kept out in the open, no protection –  and the bomb blast broke windows and benches and walls around it,  but there was no damage at all to this portrait of the young pregnant Lady,  nor was there sign of scorching or smoke on it.

And how about a “painting”  that shows no sign of paint or vegetable dye or any other known way of putting color on fibers that today’s forensic scientists can discover, and yet the color looks fresh and new and seems to float somehow just above the cactus fibers.

That is supernatural.

Today is December 12th, the day the Church reminds us to think about this cactus fiber tilma  (like a poncho)  that belonged to Juan Diego in the 1530s who spoke with the young Lady in the portrait, and who told him to go to his bishop and tell him to build a chapel there where the young Lady appeared.

Of course this peasant man was not believed by the bishop!

But that winter day he went back to the place where he saw her a couple times, and was amazed to see roses growing on the hillside.   He took it as a sign . . .  he picked the abundant fresh and beautiful roses,  made a sort of pouch or apron out of the tilma he was wearing . . .  and carried the roses to the bishop.

“See?”   he was going to say.  “See –  these are roses blooming in the winter, out of season, so something special did really happen  –“

OLG and crescent

But the bishop and his assistants weren’t listening.  They were staring in awe at the tilma that Juan Diego had opened up for them, and what they saw was this beautiful picture of the young pregnant Lady, whom the church officials recognize as Our Lady,  the Virgin Mary, so beautiful, so well-portrayed,  so full of information about Church teaching and about the local Mexican culture.

And the amazed Church officials dropped to their knees, knowing who it was they were looking at.

True story?

Of course.

No doubts,  because you can travel down to Mexico City,  and you can view the actual tilma owned by Juan Diego with the wondrous image of Our Lady,  and displayed for almost five  hundred years.     It’s there.  It really exists.

church

If you’re a scientist of some sort, you can get permission to perform yet more tests  on it;  but you will not find any explanation for the portrait.

Or you can read books about some of the scientific findings on this miraculous tilma.

December 12th,  Our Lady of Guadalupe, a word that sounds almost identical to the early Mexican-Aztec language for “slayer of the  serpent god.”   The pagan winged serpent.  the one that will be once and for all finally crushed by the heel of Our Lady through her Son,  Jesus Christ, along with that crescent moon god symbol under her feet.    Hmmmm.

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