Posted tagged ‘oxen’

SKIDS AND STEERS . . . FOR ADVENT

December 4, 2018

(As Advent begins,  clear the clutter and open your mind.)

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I’m going to be a little goofy tonight,  but, well . . .  interpret this —

Blank Sign

Okay,  I see interesting things during the day, and sometimes those things lead to a whole long string of thoughts.   My mind is ever busy.  I have ADHD of the brain.  Well,  just the (H)yperactive part.     A day or two ago I was driving along in my car, when my eyes scanned a sign on a telephone pole.    “RENT EXCAVATOR SKID STEER.”     A second or two later my mind said,  “Huh?”

TOO MANY STEER

 

I know what a steer is.   But as busy as my mind was being, I couldn’t make sense of that sign and I couldn’t stop the cascade of thoughts that followed.  And that got me observing all the trivial things going on in my head and thinking about how easy it is to get so preoccupied with minor things that you scarcely have time to think – deeply – about serious things that are actually meaningful  to your whole life.  Deeply enough.

In this time of Advent,  we vaguely feel that we should be preparing for something important that we celebrate in a few weeks.  

But we’re  busy people and we spend our life distracted.

Too much to do!

Too many places to go!

Too many commitments!

Too many choices of entertainment!

Too much information!

too many words

Too much . . . too much . . .

Now, this posting was brought on by the fact that I’m going through old papers in my house — all those “great things” that I read and saved from, oh, so long ago.   It made sense to hold on to interesting articles many years ago when I was a teacher and needed handy material or needed to present some “evidence” of what I was saying;   but now, not so much.

These “great things” should all be in my head by now,  so much a part of me that when I teach, the information flows out seamlessly — as though I had thought about it, meditated on it, discarded the superfluous and only the best part became part of my thinking.

That means concentrating, paying attention, and thinking about what I read on all these saved articles, so the information has enlarged my thinking.

 

I don’t need the actual pieces of paper.     Right?

too many papers

One of the old articles I had saved was good advice for parents:     Do not give your children an abundance of toys.   Many of us can afford to do so, but don’t.   It will teach them to value things less and it will teach them to be wasteful.

too manytoys

It was a very convincing article.

And I am guilty, guilty, guilty.    Dear Cooper, my grandson, I will try to not to give you so much from now on…   (Starting after this Christmas.)

Now back to that cryptic sign I saw on a telephone pole in my town recently.    RENT EXCAVATOR SKID STEER (followed by a telephone number.)

I said I knew what a steer was (I thought)   but I looked it up and checked anyway.    From the Britannica  dictionary:

In the terminology used to describe the sex and age of cattle, the male is first a bull calf and if left intact becomes a bull; if castrated he becomes a steer and in about two or three years grows to an ox.

Did you know a male cow can become an ox?   As often as I have taught my classes about ox goads,  I never questioned what an ox was.     Or how it came about.

But the image of an ox – or a steer – skidding did not “compute” in my mind.

So I looked up “skid” and found some images of actual  “skid steers”  —

SKID STEER 1

Or else:

SKID STEER 2

Or else:

SKID STEER 3

Doesn’t look like they all do the same thing,  but I guess if you needed one, you’d know which one to get.

Especially if you wanted to “excavate” like the sign said.

I said this is a goofy posting — but that whole chain-of-thought process illustrates what I was  trying to say.     “In this time of Advent,  we vaguely feel that we should be preparing for something important that we celebrate in a few weeks. “

What if we spend that much time, not looking up “skid steers,”  but looking up, discovering,  thinking about  Advent, and just Who it is that we are preparing for,  and why do we have to prepare, and what does that  mean that He had a First Coming and He will come back in a Second Coming?

It would enlarge our thinking.     We would value our thoughts.   We wouldn’t spend so much time on an abundance of trivial things, like a kid with too many toys.

It would make us different (and better) people.   We would be properly prepared.     And thankful.

Deo gratias.

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